Through its discriminatory declarations and votes in international bodies the EU acts as an arsonist, fanning the flames of anti-Semitism in its anti-Israeli disguise.Simultaneously it also serves as fireman, trying to quench the flames of classic religious and ethnic anti-Semitism. Although European anti-Semitism cannot be eradicated, certain steps can be taken to mitigate it.A phenomenon that develops intensely in an entire continent over a period of many centuries becomes deeply embedded in the societal mindset and behavior. In his view, in certain European circles, revenge is being taken against the Jews because "nobody will ever forgive the Jews for the Holocaust." Sacks drew attention to the manipulation of words, like genocide and ethnic cleansing, by Israel's adversaries.

This does not imply that all or most Europeans are anti-Semites.

In a similar manner, a significant number of Europeans like ballet, while many others find it boring, decadent, or disgusting.

This requires a major change in discriminatory EU policies toward Israel.

In the meantime there are increasing indications that the European battle against anti-Semitism may be used, to the contrary, to facilitate attacks on Israel.

European anti-Semitism can be said to have similar characteristics.

That many Europeans condemn, dislike, or are indifferent to anti-Semitism does not contradict its role in European culture, as statements of European politicians, the mainstream media, and leading intellectuals prove.

Also, various types of anti-Semitic sentiments are expressed in polls.

The statistics would probably reveal that the number of European anti-Semites far exceeds those who like ballet. What more could and can we do to fight anti-Semitism? He asserted that when civilizations clash, Jews die.

In the words of UK Chief Rabbi Jonathan Sacks: Let me state the point as simply as I can: anti-Semitism is alive, active and virulent in the year 2002, after more than half a century of Holocaust education, interfaith dialogue, United Nations' declarations, dozens of museums and memorials, hundreds of films, thousands of courses, and tens of thousands of books dedicated to exposing its evils; after the Stockholm Conference, after the creation of a National Holocaust Memorial Day, after 2,000 religious leaders came together in the United Nations in August 2000 to commit themselves to fight hatred and engender mutual respect. It appears in waves, which may, but do not necessarily, correspond to developments in the Israeli-Arab conflict, with each wave being higher than the previous one.